Ness Knight | NAMIBIA: OPEN SPACE
EXPLORER, PRESENTER, SPEAKER. My greatest passion lies in exploring my mental and physical limits in some of the world’s most unique locations and terrains.
endurance, motivation, influencer, female athlete, explorer, British explorer, female explorer, female adventurer, adventurer, presenter, exploration, tv, uk, travel, blogger, female fitness model, motivational speaker, speaker, endurance athlete, triathlon, Ness Knight, open water swimming, swimming, cycling, women's cycling, outdoors, pacific ocean row, pacific row, explorer namibia, SUP, Thames swim, world record
2076
page-template,page-template-full_width,page-template-full_width-php,page,page-id-2076,page-child,parent-pageid-2053,eltd-core-1.0.3,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,borderland-ver-1.9, vertical_menu_with_scroll,smooth_scroll,paspartu_enabled,paspartu_on_top_fixed,paspartu_on_bottom_fixed,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.12,vc_responsive
 

NAMIBIA: OPEN SPACE

2016 Expedition: Namibia

Namib Desert, solo

q

Ness has just come back from an expedition in one of the most remote corners of the world, in northern Namibia filming a documentary with Red Bull Media House. It’s a desolate and unforgiving place, a harsh environment, but one filled with remarkable beauty in every form. The expedition began on the banks of the Kunene River bordering Angola, tracking south towards Brandberg mountain, before heading west to follow the coastline down to the great sand dunes near Swakopmund.

 

Namibia was in the grips of a 3-year long drought that had sucked the life out of these lands to the North, affecting both the nomadic tribes as well as the wildlife. Ness travelling through lion and elephant territory, immersed in an extraordinary wilderness unlike any other on the planet.

 

Due to drought and extreme temperatures up to 49 degrees Celcius Ness faced the sobering reality of exhaustion, dehydration and exposure in this desert landscape, reminded of the fact that ego must be left behind and local knowledge sought in order to not only survive, but thrive in this incredible environment.

July – Sept 2016

The Expedition

q

Remote Wilderness

 

Ness took on the expedition by fatbike to ensure she could access and explore areas of northern Namibia which have been untouched by humans for many years. This is one of the world’s most extraordinary landscapes shaped over millions of years, and home to lion and elephant who have learnt to not only survive, but thrive in on of the world’s most inhospitable, unforgiving and arid environments. Passing ghost towns, and ancient mines Ness saw a unique and untouched beauty by exploring the country’s most remote regions.

 

Namib Desert

 

In the oldest desert in the world, at least 55 million years old, Ness experienced why Namibia is called ‘the land God made in anger’. Dust storms, extreme temperatures and ancient bolder fields were all part of the challenge. Ness headed South to Namibia’s iconic Brandberg Mountain before turning west towards the ocean and the fierce headwinds and tumultuous weather of the Atlantic.

It was here, where land meets ocean, that Ness was faced with the notoriously thick Namib fog that envelops the desert from the Atlantic.

 

Fatbike and equipment

 

I took minimal kit with her to make space for supplies, especially water, as she fatbiked through the arid desert landscape. Her bike was fitted with custom bag storage to carry all the essentials for the journey, but still allow for flexibility when tackling the steep 200-300 meter sand dunes and rugged rocky mountains slopes of the Namib. Ness focused on using kit which could stand up to the extreme temperatures, salt water, sharp rock and dust storms.

 

Across the desert I will be assisted by an expert paramotor pilot who will meet me at set points, checking I am hitting my water caches and discussing vital weather conditions and challenges of the next leg of the journey.